All Bourgogne wines
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Bourgogne Passe-tout-grains

The Bourgogne winegrowing region produces great wines with historical and international renown.
Although the most famous may be the Premiers and Grands Crus, there are also many wonderful appellations Régionales and Village for you to discover.
With 84 appellations to explore, your adventure has only just begun!

For many years, the Bourgogne winegrowing region has claimed to have around 100 AOCs. However, there are in fact 84 AOCs. The rest made up by the Dénominations Géographiques Complémentaires (DGCs) within the Bourgogne AOC.  

Wine Characteristics


Style differs according to the region of production and according to the relative proportions of Gamay and Pinot grapes in its make-up. There are glints of mauve and fuchsia in its colour. A light, fresh, well-fruited wine with immediate appeal. If its vivacity is due to the Gamay grapes, it is the Pinot grapes which lend it its mellow serenity. The attack is lively and strong on fruit. Well-textured, it develops aromas of underbrush, game, and brandied cherries.

Wine Steward’s Tip


This red wine is notably well-fruited in its aromatic makeup and lends itself readily to good plain cooking. Its fluidity makes it an indispensable adjunct to fine cold cuts, pies and cold ham. Its delicate tannic framework is not overwhelmed by vegetable tarts, mashed vegetables, or even tomato salads. It makes an ideal companion for all kinds of finger-food served at picnics and barbecues. It is also well-suited to soft and soft-centred cheeses such as Camembert.
Serving temperature: 11 to 12°C.
 

Situation


It is a blend of Pinot Noir grapes and Gamay noir à jus blanc. This makes it unique among non-effervescent Bourgogne. Combining two such different grapes takes considerable skill. The blending takes place when the grapes are loaded into the vats - it is not a blend of different wines. At least one third of the grapes must be from the Pinot variety. The area of production is the same for all Bourgogne. The appellation dates from 1937.The wines are mostly reds and for the very rare exception, rosés.

Terroirs

While the Pinot Noir grows virtually everywhere in Bourgogne, the Gamay is mainly found in the département of Saône-et-Loire, especially the Mâconnais region where the soils are particularly favourable - flints, sands and clays mixed with pebbles which are often of granitic origin.

Appellations Régionales, explained by Jean-Pierre Renard

Bourgogne appellations

  • Category

    Regional appellation

  • Wine-producing region

    APPELLATIONS SUR PLUSIEURS VIGNOBLES

  • Information


    Appellation Régionale of Bourgogne.
    The appellation BOURGOGNE PASSE-TOUT-GRAINS is restricted to red and rosé wines produced within the defined area of the BOURGOGNE appellation.
    Producing communes:
    Department of Yonne: 54 communes.
    Department of Côte-d’Or: 91 communes.
    Department of Saône-et-Loire: 154 communes.
     

  • Production surface area


    Area under production*:
    1 hectare (ha) = 10,000 m² = 24 ouvrées.
    430.49 ha.
     

Coulour

Red and rosé wines - Pinot Noir (min. 1/3) and Gamay (max. 2/3), the grapes being mixed before vinification.

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